“Reliving Let’s Regenerate” food forest project from April 2019″

Hi all,

Its already the end of June, for us in Boodaville this means high temperatures, close to no rain and a lot of work. But that is a good thing. And the best thing this year must be to be able to watch the Boodaville food forest thrive in these harsh conditions. It has been an absolute joy to watch it grow and be able to harvest. We are aware that we are only reaping the fruits planted by the ones before us. Without the amazing design of Kate and the brave volunteers of Youth In Permaculture last April the Food Forest would not be here right now. So now seems like a good time to look back at a successful week in which the next phase off the food forest started. Because permaculture is among so many other things about sharing, we want to share a little about the process leading to Let´s Regenerate and the week itself.

The tale of the food forest starts in October 2016. During 2016, 2017 and 2018, also known as the first phase. Paths were outlined and the first tree donuts were a fact. A key component was learning by observation which gave us a lot of information. So we arrive in April 2019. All the ingredients are in Boodaville; all the information gathered over the years, a piece of land where multiple regenerating practice have taken place, Kate’s design and a group of passionate volunteers.

design.png

The idea behind the design is to create guilds. These are families of plants that support each other.guild.jpg

If you are interested in knowing more about the desing check out the design report:

Boodaville Food Forest Design Report

Let’s regenerate took place in seven days. Seven days of hard work, planting trees, working together and fun!

 

 

We want to again thank everyone involved!

Supported by

erasmus+

Rocket stove building…

Read and watch the video about our rocket stove at Boodaville. Thanks so much to everyone involved, especially the wonderful Jordi Cavaller who made it all happen. The post on how to best use the stove is written by Jessica, and the excellent video of the construction was made by Aggelos.

Rocketstove

“Some days the smoke comes back into the house, even accompanied with flames. The rocket is supposed to rocket upwards, not straight into the house! Soon I realised this was caused by two problems which we needed to fix”

The rocketstove was built in July 2018. Experienced rocketstove builder Jordi taught us how to create an efficient heater out of very simple and locally sourced materials. All we used was an old metal drum, metal L shaped pipe, bricks, tiles, soil, sand and straw.

Continue reading “Rocket stove building…”

I wrote an email to Women’s Permaculture Guild and this came out :
 
Hi Heather,
 
Thanks for all your amazing work on this. You are doing an excellent job of creating engagement.
I honestly have a little problem with the “women only” aspect. While i recognise completely that this is a “reformative” measure based on the current imbalance, I look forward to the time in the future where we can create a “revolutionary” platform representing the equal situation we are ultimately aiming for.

Continue reading “”

June at Boodaville…

 

 

See more about our WICKING BED here (fotos de la construcción del “wicking bed” aqui)

Read more about our TRACTOR TOILET here (leer mas del váter aquí)

Read more about our ZAÏ COMPOSTING here (leer mas del sistema de compost zaï aqui)

 

Olive harvest Part 1, and planting

WhatsApp Image 2017-11-13 at 09.16.07

Team Mulberry! We didn’t collect the olives, they won’t be ready for another 2 weeks.. so we’ll be coming back again. We planted 2 small trees, lots of seeds, broccoli and put down mulch, mulch and more mulch!! A great weekend 🙂 Thanks to Javi, Fer and Maja.

The tree is so small it doesn’t even stick up above the mulch in the photo! A little mulberry, given to us by Gerald in Albinyana! Thank you
#Boodaville #permaculturefarm#permaculture #permacultura#environment #agricultura #ecoliving

A geeky post about designing…

#treepropagation #growing #seedlings #design #permaculture #smallandslowsolutions #boodaville #riberola

At the Riberola Festival on 7th October Boodaville ran an Intro to Permaculture workshop and we did a practical planting seeds of 3 different types of trees, which have properties such as – drought resistant, fast growing, providing food for animals, (Jujube is edible for humans too), fixing nitrogen, resistant to high and low temperatures, don’t have loads of pests. The trees are Honey Locust, Jujube and Italian Buckthorn.

We left the seeds in vinegar for a few hours (ideally it would be overnight) and we scratched the surface of the seeds.. this imitates the natural process of the seeds being chewed by animals then in their acidic stomachs for a while.

Here is the picture of the seeds on the 10th November.

WhatsApp Image 2017-11-13 at 09.15.12

Honestly I have no idea whether anything growing there is the beginning of a tree. I mean I can see what is grass, but the other little things sprouting… I’m not sure!! What I did notice before I pulled out most of the grass is that the one pot with a bit of straw mulch, upper right of the photo you see? That pot had 5 times as much grass as the others. (yes.. i should have taken that picture!!)

¡¡¡THE GAME!!!!  : SPOT THE DIFFERENCE! between the three pictures 🙂

 

Winter Seedlings Photo 1
Winter Seedlings Photo 1
Winter Seedlings Photo 2
Winter Seedlings Photo 2
Winter Seedlings Photo 3
Winter Seedlings Photo 3

And here’s an explanation of what’s going on in these pictures. The level of detail to which we plan every step of the design is incredible to me. There’s so much to think about… I mean it took me weeks to find out which trees would be good to plant and to then collect the seeds. Luckily other permaculturists around have given me some seeds and helped out with that bit – Gerald gave me Honey Locust pods to take out the seeds, Alessandro told me about the Italian Buckthorn on the outskirts of Barcelona, and Richard gave me a bag of Jujube fruit he had collected from a tree about 10km from Boodaville.

The next step is leaving the seeds to grow over winter. They need water, they mustn’t freeze, and some sunshine would be good. Here are some of the things I thought about when I set them up like this

  1. Near the thermal mass wall of the house to prevent freezing
  2. Straw insulation
  3. Leave the crate a little bit away from the wall so none of the trees stay dry under the overhanging roof
  4. Leave the crate directly on the ground so there is drainage and they won’t get flooded in a storm
  5. No straw between the wall and the crate as the wall is the warm bit
  6. Relatively wind protected location
  7. Location that gets sun from 1pm until half an hour before sunset
  8. Overhanging tree will also help prevent frost
  9. Stones to help keep straw in place
  10. The changes I made between photos 1 and 3 in your spot the difference game were the last things I adjusted.

GOOD LUCK TREE SEEDLINGS!!!!!

Thank you so much to Gerald in Albinyana for teaching me all of this!! and any comments, suggestions to people who’ve managed to read this far are very very welcome!!